Florian Shulz: Freedom to Roam

Florian Schulz is a professional nature photographer and a founding member of the International League of Conservation Photographers (ILCP). His Freedom to Roam Project chronicles wildlife migration corridors and shows how each piece of the conservation puzzle connects with the others. This project documents the affects of global warming and human encroachment on wild spaces and makes clear the need for protected wildlife corridors to allow migrating species to be able to move throughout their ranges safely and freely.

Phase one of the Freedom to Roam project documents the wildlife corridor that runs from the arctic down along the coast and through the mountains of North America. The photography from this phase, known as Y2Y or Yellowstone to Yukon, was compiled into a book and selected photos are also on display at the Field Museum in Chicago. Schultz is now starting work on phase two, B2B or Baja to the Beaufort Sea.

The stunning video above puts a face to the conservation efforts and shows just what it is scientists and other conservationists are working to protect. The caribou in this video migrate over proposed oil drilling land, pristine wilderness that the oil companies would have us believe is barren and purposeless but for the oil that lies beneath it. With the effects of global warming diminishing arctic habitat it is more important than ever to protect that habitat, and to make more habitat accessible to arctic wildlife.

For more information on the Freedom to Roam project and award-winning photographer Florian Shulz visit visionsofthewild.com.  The NY Times article Home on the Range also provides information on the proposed protection of the Y2Y wildlife corridor.

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2 comments to Florian Shulz: Freedom to Roam

  • When we were in Yellowstone last summer we saw an exhibit of his work. Beautiful. Then again, we saw one in Chicago in May, at the Museum of Natural History. He’s amazing. Thank you for sharing his message.

  • When we were ij Yellowstone last summer we saw an exhibit of his work. Beaitiful. Then again, we saw one in Chicago in May, at the Museum of Natural History. He's amazing. Thank you for sharing his message.;